San Francisco
dream
factory

San Francisco
dream
factory

This bridge is more than just a bridge. It’s a private compass, pointing San Francisco toward new dreams. Like a thread stretched between two worlds, it disappears, looms into view, suspends horizons, forms a dotted line in the mist, beating a path to somewhere else. 

1.

Imaginary landscapes

Let’s set aside anything that might detract from the grace of the encounter: the awards (including that of World’s Best Female Chef), TV appearances, the many stars. Let’s focus on what’s key. Dominique Crenn has allowed her Breton roots to steep in the Pacific mist. She has polished her childhood memories like itinerant pebbles and released them in her restaurant so she can “serve her soul.” Everything here deceives the eye; it’s a place of exploration and enigmas. Indeed, the menu takes the form of a culinary rebus, a seasonal poem that acquires meaning as the journey unfolds. “Come with me and look into the golden light.” From one verse to the next a world takes form, the ingredients appear and return, the lobster in cool gelée offsetting the slight warmth of the lobster and flageolets with lime zest and seaweed. The poem lengthens to become a chaconne, brioche is immersed in an umami mushroom broth. A pistachio and sea salt sorbet nestles in a green olive, a grated cookie resembles a fragment of truffle, the desserts cling to the branches of a tree. “Walking deep in the woods.” Nature in metamorphoses.

Atelier Crenn

3127 Fillmore Street. Tél. +1 415 440 0460.

www.ateliercrenn.com

Petit Crenn

La table bretonnante de Dominique Crenn, version cuisine familiale et accessible. 609 Hayes Street. Tél. +1 415 864 1744.

www.petitcrenn.com

2.

Street fiction

A few bronze chairs and armchairs left behind by artist Primitivo Suarez-Wolfe stand at the intersection of Church Street and Duboce Avenue. While waiting for the Muni Metro (light rail/ streetcar system), people curl up with a book or doze as they browse a newspaper. Life has a knack for this kind of irony: just a stone’s throw from Apple and Facebook, a love of paper resists. In fact, even the digital giants admit that they recommend prudent use of tabletsat home. When it comes to inventing the future, nothing beats the sensory emotion of reality. In this city where Beat Generation writers came to seek answers, a profusion of well-established bookstores offers an endless invitation for immersion. Case for Making sells artistic marbled paper, while the legendary City Lights is a place of pilgrimage. Afterward, look up when Brian Goggin’s and Dorka Keehn’s suspended books light up, pretending to fly off to other skies.

Domestic Seatings

Par Primitivo Suarez-Wolfe, intersection Church Street et Duboce Avenue.

Case for Making

4037 Judah Street.

www.caseformaking.com

City Lights

261 Columbus Avenue. Tél. +1 415 362 8193.

www.citylights.com

Language of the birds

Par Brian Goggin et Dorka Keehn, angle Broadway, Grant et Columbus Avenues.

À lire

The Beat Generation in San Francisco, a Literary Guidebook Bill Morgan, City Lights Books & Publishers..

3.

Head in the clouds

Just before the northbound Golden Gate Bridge is a place like a world’s end, a national park traversed by the winds from the bay and the rondos of the migratory birds. Seek out the highest point, beneath the eucalyptuses and cypresses, to get a sense of its vastness within the city. Long off-limits to inhabitants as a military base, the Presidio has been rediscovering the tranquility of civilian life. It is dotted with restaurants, cafés, concerts, an urban campground, a bowling alley, a climbing wall, an 18-hole golf course (formerly for officers) and works by Andy Goldsworthy scattered among the trees. There’s also a Walt Disney museum and a Lucasfilm campus, George Lucas being an avid supporter of this ambitious rehabilitation. Staying in the small, elegant hotel run by the Presidio Trust will transport you to another life, one of Georgian symmetry with red-brick walls and denticulated moldings. This timeless place includes Funston House, a Victorian three-bedroom outbuilding that can be rented in its entirety, so that your mind can drift between two shores.

The Presidio

Inn at the Presidio

42 Moraga Avenue on The Presidio’s Main Post. Tél. +1 415 800 7356.

www.innatthepresidio.com

Rob Hill Campground

1475 Central Magazine Road.

4.

Dreams come true

The chosen location of software company 3D Autodesk for its business lab/incubator seems symbolic: Pier 9 and its abandoned warehouses. It picked the port as the best place to cast off the mooring lines of reason. Here they let ideas come to them, where they mature and cross-breed, and are then shaped under the scrutiny of engineers, inventors, designers and artists in residence. Whether it’s improving a wheelchair or the shape of a shoe, cutting-edge workshops offer researchers a multitude of possibilities. The explorations are fast and furious: laser or water jet, tools are activated and materials are cut, shaped, poured, polished, soldered and screwed. And abstract ideas suddenly come to life.

Autodesk Gallery at One Market Floor

2. 1 Market Street. Tél. +1 415 356 7000.

www.autodesk.com/gallery/overview

Dépôt des candidatures pour les résidences créatives Deux fois par an, pour une durée de quatre mois.

5.

Fairy-tale dweelings

Fairy-tale dwellings The rows of Painted Ladies add sugar and spice to the city and are a perfect pretext for an evening stroll. Seek out the turrets’ cake decor motifs, relish the dragée-like bow windows, take in the pastel-shingled cladding, dip into the lacy meringue clinging to the balconies, gaze at the whipped cream coating the sequoia slats, feast your eyes on the frosting of the colorful window friezes, spot the creepers winding round the columns like candy cane stripes. When night darkens and dreams float between the hills, San Francisco’s Victorian houses take on the magical flavor of fairy tales.

6.

Spurcycle’s idée fixe

Some ventures are a crazy gamble. The one that Nick and Clint Slone embarked on seemed like a pipe dreama niche product, as niche as an exceptional bicycle bell. Nothing was left to chance; it all had to be perfect, from the note to the volume and the feel of the object. Each component is made in the United States, and everything is assembled by hand in their Sausalito factory. For three years, their bells crowned with domes like mini-basilicas have been chiming all over the world, in a long, clear vibrato that no car horn can drown out.

Les produits Spurcycle sont distribués dans plusieurs magasins de San Francisco, dont :

Huckleberry Bicycles

1073 Market Street. Tél. +1 415 484 6575.

www.huckleberrybicycles.com

The New Wheel

420 Cortland Avenue. Tél. +1 415 524 7362.

www.newwheel.net

7.

A spirit of curiosity

A year ago, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) reopened with three times as much floor space, flanked by an extension with undulating folds (an echo of the bay’s rippling waters), designed by Norwegian agency Snøhetta. This unabashed desire to escape from its original enclosure and embrace new terrain spawned another idea: bringing other worlds into its shell. In addition to its rich contemporary art collections, the museum has worked on a culinary approach, joining forces with one of the city’s best chefs, Corey Lee, who runs the legendary Benu. But instead of playing solo in the kitchen, Lee opted to incorporate his fellow chefs’ dishes into the museum: thanks to a condensed menu that changes much like exhibitions, the inquisitive gourmet can travel at the flick of a fork: lobster with wasabi concocted by Tim Raue in Berlin, braised octopus by Virgilio Martínez Véliz in Lima, lemon tart by Massimo Bottura in Modena. Just scan the list and your taste buds will take off.

SFMoMA 151

3rd Street. Tél. +1 415 357 4000.

www.sfmoma.org

Restaurant In Situ

Tél. +1 415 941 6050.

insitu.sfmoma.org

8.

Coppola country

His name is synonymous with the whole region. Francis Ford Coppola has always remained faithful to this outpost of the Hollywood industry by locating his production company here in San Francisco. Little by little, his whole world has infiltrated into the city’s veins. His Cafe Zoetrope, with souvenirs on the walls and bistro tables, delivers simple Italian cuisine. A few months ago, it became possible to pick up a story here, delivered randomly by a vending machine according to the selected reading time (one, three or five minutes). A few miles away, the legend of Francis and his clan continues with the family winery, open to visitors. Distant mountains, a building worthy of Harry Potter and an arbor laden with wisteria form the setting for a tasting of the filmmaker’s wines, sitting at a table surrounded by relics from The Godfather. His latest project follows the acquisition of a nearby establishment to resurrect the wine brand Virginia Dare, which evokes the country’s myths and legends: in particular, that of little Virginia, the first child of English colonialists to be born on American soil and who disappeared mysteriously with the rest of the community. Before you leave, visit the store, whose Native American and Conquest of the West themes complete a neat piece of storytelling.

Francis Ford Coppola Winery et Restaurant Rustic Francis’s Favorites

300 Via Archimedes, Geyserville. Tél. +1 707 857 1400.

www.francisfordcoppolawinery.com

Virginia Dare Winery & Restaurant Werowocomoco

22281 Chianti Road, Geyserville. Tél. +1 707 735 3500.

www.virginiadarewinery.com

9.

Artistic viewpoints

Keep an eye on him at all times: he’s likely to escape from his workshop anytime. Jay Nelson started out building little wooden huts on wheels to travel the world in, paint and surf. Then his mobile homes turned into tree houses with windows that were positioned according to the surrounding countryside. Now Nelson expresses himself through other structures, custom made for his paintings. He is now focused on the possibilities offered by these constructions for his canvases. His pictorial world speaks of words, of their abstraction when they are detached from language, of their poetry when they dance together. These are works that create a different perspective.

Architectural Pavilions: Experiments and Artifacts

Exposition du 24.06 au 7.01.2018. Museum of Craft and Design. 2569 3rd Street. Tél. +1 415 773 0303.

www.sfmcd.org

10.

A city in the city

The Palace Hotel, built in 1875 and once the world’s largest and most modern hotel, has something of the Grand Budapest Hotel about it. It was praised for its elevator cabins, telegraph machine on each floor and private bathrooms. Destroyed by the 1906 earthquake, it was reborn in 1909, with a huge Pied Piper of Hamelin being commissioned from the painter of utopias Maxfield Parrish. Renovated in 2015, it has benefited from the economic boost provided by the tech companies in the neighborhood. With its 480 employees and 556 rooms, the Palace is a kind of city within the city, teeming with life underneath the gilding that triggers a multitude of impressions: utter delight, with illumination from the cathedral skylight and the meticulous attention to detail of the liveried staff; full-blown amazement when a wedding worthy of maharajas takes place; and childlike jubilation when mail travels from one floor to the next via a pneumatic tube system that runs through the hotel. Nostalgics can revisit the 1970s by using the services of the business center, unchanged from the era of the fax. The more hedonistic will take a big breath as they slip into the waters of the top-floor pool, beneath an arched glass ceiling surrounded by skyscrapers from a very different era outside.

Palace Hotel

2 New Montgomery Street. Tél. +1 415 512 1111.

www.sfpalace.com

Hotel G

Just a block from Union Square and ten minutes from SFMOMA, this is the ideal anchorage for city-lubbers who love the 1950s American design theme and polished concrete floors. It boasts welcoming, spacious rooms (but paper-thin walls), C.O. Bigelow products in the bathroom, and artworks on the wall from the Creativity Explored centera Mission District studio for artists with developmental disabilities. The upper floors offer views of the ocean in the distance, when the mists clear. No breakfast, but right opposite there’s a great diner, the real thing, open 24/24, which will satisfy even the biggest appetites.

Hotel G

386 Geary Street. Tél. +1 415 986 2000.

www.hotelgsanfrancisco.com

Pinecrest Diner

401 Geary Street. Tél. +1 415 885 6407.

www.pinecrestdiner.com

© Primitivo Suarez-Wolfe

Alcohol abuse is harmful to your health. Drink in moderation

Carnet d’adresses

Atelier Crenn

3127 Fillmore Street. Tél. +1 415 440 0460.

www.ateliercrenn.com

Petit Crenn

La table bretonnante de Dominique Crenn, version cuisine familiale et accessible. 609 Hayes Street. Tél. +1 415 864 1744.

www.petitcrenn.com

Domestic Seatings

Par Primitivo Suarez-Wolfe, intersection Church Street et Duboce Avenue.

Case for Making

4037 Judah Street.

www.caseformaking.com

City Lights

261 Columbus Avenue. Tél. +1 415 362 8193.

www.citylights.com

Language of the birds

Par Brian Goggin et Dorka Keehn, angle Broadway, Grant et Columbus Avenues.

À lire

The Beat Generation in San Francisco, a Literary Guidebook Bill Morgan, City Lights Books & Publishers..

The Presidio

Inn at the Presidio

42 Moraga Avenue on The Presidio’s Main Post. Tél. +1 415 800 7356.

www.innatthepresidio.com

Rob Hill Campground

1475 Central Magazine Road.

Autodesk Gallery at One Market Floor

2. 1 Market Street. Tél. +1 415 356 7000.

www.autodesk.com/gallery/overview

Dépôt des candidatures pour les résidences créatives Deux fois par an, pour une durée de quatre mois.

Spurcycle

Huckleberry Bicycles

1073 Market Street. Tél. +1 415 484 6575.

www.huckleberrybicycles.com

The New Wheel

420 Cortland Avenue. Tél. +1 415 524 7362.

www.newwheel.net

SFMoMA 151

3rd Street. Tél. +1 415 357 4000.

www.sfmoma.org

Restaurant In Situ

Tél. +1 415 941 6050.

insitu.sfmoma.org

Francis Ford Coppola Winery et Restaurant Rustic Francis’s Favorites

300 Via Archimedes, Geyserville. Tél. +1 707 857 1400.

www.francisfordcoppolawinery.com

Virginia Dare Winery & Restaurant Werowocomoco

22281 Chianti Road, Geyserville. Tél. +1 707 735 3500.

www.virginiadarewinery.com

Jay Nelson

Architectural Pavilions: Experiments and Artifacts

Exposition du 24.06 au 7.01.2018. Museum of Craft and Design. 2569 3rd Street. Tél. +1 415 773 0303.

www.sfmcd.org

Palace Hotel

2 New Montgomery Street. Tél. +1 415 512 1111.

www.sfpalace.com

Hotel G

386 Geary Street. Tél. +1 415 986 2000.

www.hotelgsanfrancisco.com

Pinecrest Diner

401 Geary Street. Tél. +1 415 885 6407.

www.pinecrestdiner.com

Shopping

Heath Ceramics

The leading local ceramics manufacturer since 1948, with factories in San Francisco and Sausalito. Rather robust dinnerware and striking wall tiles that will appeal to interior design enthusiasts. 2900 18th Street, San Francisco. Tél. +1 415 361 5552. 400 Gate Five Road, Sausalito.

www.heathceramics.com

Mudpie

The kind of shop for kids they don’t make anymore, a cross between Aladdin’s Cave and the Oleson store in The Little House on the Prairie. A local favorite. 2185 Fillmore Street. Tél. +1 415 771 9262.

www.mudpie-sf.com

Flatiron Wines & Spirits

This store next door to the Palace Hotel is run by wine specialists who really know their stuff. It stocks products from all over the world, with a special emphasis on California wines. Excellent advice free from the local marketing ploys. 2 New Montgomery Street. Tél. +1 415 780 14 05

flatiron-wines.com

Restaurants

Al’s Place

One of the most talked about spots of the day, with all the fashionable features of contemporary nouvelle cuisine: flowers, irreverent cooking methods (pickled French fries) and asymmetrical plate arrangements punctuated with sauce. 1499 Valencia Street.

alsplacesf.com

Woodhouse Fish Co.

Delicious fish’n’chips; no frills, quality fare.1914 Tél. +1 415 437 2722.

Overview
Overview
Address Book
Vidéo

240

Going There

www.airfrance.com

Flight frequency

Air France has 2 daily flights to San Francisco from Paris-CDG.

KLM has 1 daily flight to San Francisco from Amsterdam.

Arrival airport

Aéroport international de San Francisco.
À 21 km.
Tél. +1 650 821 8211.

Air France KLM offices

À l’aéroport.

Booking

— Depuis la France : Tél. 3654.
— Depuis l’étranger :
Tél. +33 (0)892 70 26 54.

Car rental

Hertz, à l'aéroport

Tél. +1 650 624 6600.

www.airfrance.com/cars

Further reading

San Francisco
San Francisco Gallimard, coll. Cartoville.

San Francisco
Gallimard, coll. Cartoville.

San Francisco
Gallimard, coll. GEOGuide

San Francisco
Phaidon, coll. Wallpaper City Guide.

San Francisco
Louis Vuitton City Guide..

Le Goût de San Francisco
Mercure de France, coll. Le petit mercure.

© Parko Polo / Central Illustration Agency. Map for illustration purposes only