Poetic
usage

Silhouette effilée du chai Château Les Carmes Haut-Brion conçu par Philippe Starck et Luc Arsène-Henry.

Sleek cellar at Château Les Carmes Haut-Brion, designed by Philippe Starck and Luc Arsène-Henry.

Illustrations created by Cédric Rivrain for the Lanvin capsule collection (opposite page).

Lucas Ossendrijver, by Dutch photographer Viviane Sassen.

A comme Afrique. Impressions d’Afrique Avec un peu d’imagination, avec quelques accessoires aussi, avec une allée et des palmes, la Sicile, c’est aussi l’Afrique. Il ne s’agit pas d’arpenter la ville. Ailleurs est ce qui arrive.

A as in Africa: Impressions of Africa With a bit of imagination and a few accessories, such as a path and some palms, Sicily can also be Africa. You don’t have to amble all over the city. Afar is what appears.

A comme Afrique. Impressions d’Afrique Avec un peu d’imagination, avec quelques accessoires aussi, avec une allée et des palmes, la Sicile, c’est aussi l’Afrique. Il ne s’agit pas d’arpenter la ville. Ailleurs est ce qui arrive.

A as in Africa: Impressions of Africa With a bit of imagination and a few accessories, such as a path and some palms, Sicily can also be Africa. You don’t have to amble all over the city. Afar is what appears.

Backstage at the Lanvin Homme Spring-Summer 2017 runway show.

A comme Afrique. Impressions d’Afrique Avec un peu d’imagination, avec quelques accessoires aussi, avec une allée et des palmes, la Sicile, c’est aussi l’Afrique. Il ne s’agit pas d’arpenter la ville. Ailleurs est ce qui arrive.

A as in Africa: Impressions of Africa With a bit of imagination and a few accessories, such as a path and some palms, Sicily can also be Africa. You don’t have to amble all over the city. Afar is what appears.

Lanvin Homme’s creative director, Lucas Ossendrijver, who has forged an elegant vocabulary with some pretty amazing twists, celebrated his tenth year at the helm this winter.

If you had to map out the mental landscapes that inspire fashion, there’s one you can visualize by simply closing your eyes: the milky North Sea breezes, the thin, flat-scaped horizons and muted skies of misty climes. This near-topographical vision of designers trained at Brussels’ La Cambre, Antwerp’s Royal Academy and the Academy of Art and Design in Arnhem often finds its way to Paris and seeps into the wardrobes of the capital’s plush neighborhoods. Deceptively inhibited by a Calvinist heritage that spurns anything ostentatious, this creative approach prefers to phrase its visual expressions as others might play with words. At Lanvin, the work of Dutchman Lucas Ossendrijver has played on this dialectical toing and froing for ten years, mingling technical prowess with some rather surprising flights of fancy. As if he were systematically snazzing up his designs with dashes of humor, he conceptualizes, cuts, shapes, inserts, embroiders, straps up, makes asymmetrical, overstitches, lengthens, enlarges, ennobles, decorates and geometrizes. He’s been at it for a decade. It was worth taking a look.

The Lanvin Homme Spring-Summer collection has taken to stripes. Like a textbook exercise with all the inventiveness that it permits. Ossendrijver starts with a standard stripe and reinterprets it: makes it run diagonally, horizontally, vertically; steeps it in soft tropical colors; and broadens, criss-crosses, cinches and superposes it. During Art Basel Miami Beach, the designer’s narrative explored a collaborative mode, by featuring French artist Cédric Rivrain’s poetic drawings on his T-shirts and sweatshirts: a hand shielding eyes from the light like a cap; earphones and keys lying forgotten on the garment; and crossed Band-Aids on the shoulder. “It’s my interpretation of Lucas’s work for Lanvin,” explains Rivrain, who is sensitive to hidden wounds. Fragments (not really) patched up, left in a corner. The blues of a world that’s dreaming, its feet firmly on the ground.

a

Next

colette's choice