Protest over the building of Narita Airport, artist unknown (c. 1969).

Japanese
Brouhaha

M comme miniature Des miniatures à côté des miroirs, des minarets, les mêmes que dans la ville mais moindres1, les merveilles du monde dans une maison de maître2. Images au mur, ou mirages sur la mer ; masques, têtes de pierre ou cires anatomiques : des machines à songes. En un moment, l’œil ému mêle les mondes. Et rien ne manque à ces paysages minuscules3, pas même le myrte au parfum de musc.

1. À Palerme, on admirera la belle église San Cataldo. 2. Tel le Palazzo Serra di Cassano de Naples. 3. Certains lieux transportent les visiteurs dans des mondes en réduction, décors de tapisserie, paysages imaginaires : à Naples, l’hôpital des Incurables et son musée d’histoire de la médecine ; à Palerme, la Palazzina Cinese, dans le Parco della Favorita.

M as in miniature Miniatures next to mirrors, minarets, the same ones as in the city but smaller,1 the marvels of the macrocosm in a manor house.2 Images on the wall, or maritime mirages; masks, stone heads or wax anatomical models: dream machines. In a moment, the eye is moved, as it mixes and matches worlds. And nothing is missing in these mini-landscapes, not even the myrtle with its musky scent.3

1. The lovely church of San Cataldo can be admired in Palermo. 2. Like the Palazzo Serra di Cassano in Naples. 3. Certain places whisk visitors away into miniature worlds, tapestry motifs, imaginary landscapes: in Naples, the Ospedale degli Incurabili (Hospital for the Incurables) and its Museo delle Arti Sanitarie, a museum of the history of medicine; in Palermo, the Palazzina Cinese, in the Parco della Favorita.

Japanese Brouhaha

Haut de 240 m, le gratte-ciel de l’Université Lomonossov a été construit en 1953. Il compte parmi les «Sept sœurs de Staline».

Built in 1953, the skyscraper of Lomonosov Moscow State University, one of “Stalin’s Seven Sisters,” rises to a height of 240 meters.

The exhibition catalog presents images, texts and interviews never published before.

The exhibition catalog presents images, texts and interviews never published before.

Koji Taki, portrait from the third and last issue of Provoke, published in 1969.

Koji Taki, portrait from the third and last issue of Provoke, published in 1969.

Untitled, Nobuyoshi Araki (1973).

Untitled, Nobuyoshi Araki (1973).

Le Bal is organizing the first exhibition devoted to Provoke, a short-lived cult magazine that completely revolutionized the world of Japanese photography in just three issues with its grainy, blurry shots.

There are five of them, three photographers (Takuma Nakahira, Yutaka Takanashi, Daido Moriyama); a critic (Koji Taki); and a poet (Takahiko Okada). They knew little about Japan beyond the upheavals of war and the ensuing bitterness. The world had trembled beneath their feet, spawning the launch of a magazine unlike any other beforeProvokewith three issues published in 1968 and 1969. A trailblazer in punk rage, Provoke scuttled all accepted standards and notions of photography. The world was blown to bits, fragmented, fissured, wracked by convulsions and visions. Framing was skewed, contrasts saturated, the subjects blurred. Some images were taken while walking or driving, without using the viewfinder. Photography was no longer about capturing the surrounding world on film but on filming dizziness itself. The crumbling of traditional Japanese society summoned a crumbling of forms, the coining of a new visual language whose deconstructed grammar expressed horror and beauty both at once.

Provoke represented a revolutionary explosion in the history of postwar photography. More manifesto than journal, it drew on the emergence of Japanese performance art in the 1960s and the proliferation of student publications featuring scathing critiques of the US occupation. A mammoth exhibition and bookthe fruit of three years of research and collaboration between four museums, six Japanese, American and European historians, and over 40 lendersrecount the compelling history of this rebellious decade. After the Albertina in Vienna and the Fotomuseum Winterthur in Switzerland, the exhibition is being presented at Le Bal before traveling to the Art Institute of Chicago. The perfect way to stir up things in Paris this fall.

PROVOKE – ENTRE PROTESTATION ET PERFORMANCE.
LA PHOTOGRAPHIE AU JAPON DE 1960 À 1975

Du 14.09 au 11.12. Le Bal, 6, impasse de la Défense, Paris.
Tél. +33 (0)1 44 70 75 50.

www.le-bal.fr

© Nakahira Gen / Moriyama Daido / Okada Takhiko / Takanashi Yukata / Taki Koji, collection privée - Taki Yosuke, collection privée - Araki Nobuyoshi, collection Art Institute of Chicago - Tomatsu Shomei / Interface, collection Art Institute of Chicago - Mathieu Martin Delacroix

Agenda

PROVOKE – ENTRE PROTESTATION ET PERFORMANCE. LA PHOTOGRAPHIE AU JAPON DE 1960 À 1975

Du 14.09 au 11.12. Le Bal, 6, impasse de la Défense, Paris.
Tél. +33 (0)1 44 70 75 50.

www.le-bal.fr

Oran breathless

Next

Oran:
breathless